Archive | Opinions

Disruption or Destruction?

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Disruption or Destruction?

Posted on 15 September 2016 by Ian Schrauth

Consequenses of discouraging peaceful protest can be severe

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Transparency with the press

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Transparency with the press

Posted on 15 September 2016 by Ian Schrauth

Americans deserve candidates who answer tough questions

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‘Bookshots’ target new readers

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‘Bookshots’ target new readers

Posted on 15 September 2016 by Ian Schrauth

A new option for those who don’t want to read long novels

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Pokémon: To GO or not to GO?

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Pokémon: To GO or not to GO?

Posted on 31 August 2016 by admin

Pokémon GO helps people to connect to others Continue Reading

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The middle income worker finally catches a break

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The middle income worker finally catches a break

Posted on 31 August 2016 by admin

Wage law updated to keep up with the times Continue Reading

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Where was the Joker in Suicide Squad?

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Where was the Joker in Suicide Squad?

Posted on 31 August 2016 by admin

Staff Writer CJ critiques “Suicide Squad”
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Letter to the Editor: Should College Education Be Free?

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Letter to the Editor: Should College Education Be Free?

Posted on 31 August 2016 by admin

Nothing is free in a college education Continue Reading

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Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 6.35.01 PM

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Costs and other college conundrums

Posted on 22 April 2016 by admin

The sad truth about being an art student  Continue Reading

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Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 6.28.25 PM

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Unsurpassable mountains: knowing when to move on

Posted on 22 April 2016 by admin

What to do when big dreams die

 

By: BRITTNEY FARROW
Opinions Editor

 

One of the hardest things we can do in life is accept the fact that sometimes we do not get what we want.

This April would have marked the year I graduated college. If things had gone the way I had planned, I would have been buying my cap and gown and mailing my graduation announcements; I would have been sending out resumes and thinking about the next step of my career. Instead, I am in the same place I have been for some time now: making a road map of where I went wrong, and trying to figure out exactly how to get to where I want to be. It is hard not to feel discouraged when our lives follow a course so different from the one we envisioned, and yet we have to forgive ourselves for the mistakes we have made. We are allowed to grieve for the years we lost to our specific, personal circumstances, but we cannot let them hold us back.

I realized halfway through my sophomore year of college that I was sick — really sick. At the time, I lived in Arizona and my parents lived here in St. Louis. Because I needed their help and support, I decided to move back in with them, and when I did I practically started over in school.

Then, sometime last semester, I realized I was extremely unhappy with the degree path I was taking; I just could not accomplish what I needed to in order to move forward.

Knowing that switching my major would push me back even further, I decided to do so anyway, hoping it would benefit me in the long-run.

So far, it has been a good decision for me, but it is still hard to think about how far behind I am, and how that might allow me to be perceived by other people. I have always cared too much about what other people think of me, and I have always allowed that to affect my perception of myself.

Still, I know I am not alone in dealing with personal obstacles. It is something that happens to almost everyone — and frequently.

All my life, cooking has been my father’s passion, and he worked really hard throughout my childhood to advance in his career and achieve his own goals. Then, sometime two years ago, a review of his cooking was published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch; zero out of five stars, the food critic said. This devastated him.

His career and his own self-esteem are still recovering from the blow. Where would he go from there? What would he do next?

Thirty years of stress and sacrifice sabotaged by a journalist with a with a mean vocabulary and a keyboard.

It is a bitter pill to swallow when we realize that our dreams probably will not happen to us.

For some, that realization is a major heartbreak; however, it does not mean that we cannot make new dreams — that we cannot adapt and change and evolve into better and more successful people. The harder our obstacles, the more experienced we become — the more capable we are of handling what happens next.

Sometimes our achievements are not as satisfying as we had hoped, but that does not mean they are bad. It just means they are different than we would have envisioned.

Do not become discouraged by the challenges that present themselves in times of hardship. Instead, take the lessons we are given from these experiences and know — deep inside your bones — that just because something did not happen the way you wanted it to does not mean that you have failed. Failure is not a delayed graduation; failure is not a bad review. Failure is what happens when we do not move forward, and instead let our burdens keep us from finding a new path.

I can say with complete honesty that no one I know who has attempted to better themselves has failed. Maybe they have not done what they initially set out to do; maybe they were set back once, twice or dozens of times before they found a steady rhythm. Regardless of how long it took or how many times they had to fall before they found their footing, the people I know who see a better opportunity and attempt to grasp it for themselves are the people who live the most successful lives. So fall; graduate late or never; get that bad review. Whatever you do, just do not stop.

 

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My arm hurts: an argument against vaccines

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My arm hurts: an argument against vaccines

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

Why our trade of pain for peace of mind needs to be renegotiated 

By: EVAN CARLEN
Staff Writer

Why is it that the fear of the world is ironically pacified by needles, and their pacifier is an unbeknown solution to most of us?

Furthermore why is it that year-after-year, child-after-child, we plunge more of them into our arms to get vaccines for a laundry list of conditions. I am surprised there is not a vaccine for the common cold by now. Hear that Walgreens? Step it up.

With all the commercials and ads for flu shots and other vaccinations, it has become the norm to spend our hard-earned money on pain and a Power Ranger Band-Aid.

In any other context that would be considered absurd, but it is so ingrained in our culture that very few step back to weigh the pros and cons. This complete trust that “doctors know best” is not always the right road, albeit the most traveled.

Vaccines actually have many draw backs behind reducing the risk of an already one-in-a-million condition.

First of all, vaccines are obviously unnatural, and natural immunity is more effective than vaccination. Even pro-vaccine organizations state that natural vaccination causes better immunity. Plus natural vaccination creates immunity after a single natural infection whereas synthetic vaccination immunity only occurs after several doses. But hey, maybe you will get a Ninja Turtle Band-Aid your second time around.

Also, doctors are vaccinating for conditions that are all but harmless. This over-protectiveness towards the immune system is like keeping your child away from the possible dangers of school, and yet expecting great performance when they enter the workforce. Like children, immune systems need training to develop and perform optimally.

More drawbacks have to do with what is in the solutions themselves. Some vaccines include ingredients like mercury, aluminum and even formaldehyde.

All of these ingredients are linked to comas, seizures and oh yeah, death. Sounds like a well-balanced meal to me, but can I get a Powder Puff Girls Band-Aid this time?

Along with poisonous ingredients, allergies need to be taken into account.

Many complex proteins are found in vaccines that could lead to anaphylaxis in some people. Sure they will not get chicken pox but they will breakout in full body sores twice as bad as those associated with chicken pox.

One con of vaccines is particularly striking to me. The fact that we vaccinate for conditions that do not exist anymore is completely beyond me.

Polio was eradicated in the U.S. in 1979 yet it is still commonplace to vaccinate for it. No cases of diphtheria since 2002, but you still cannot come to school unless you pay the 80 bucks for it — sorry. The money grab is just ridiculous, in my opinion.

You do not see levees in the desert because the ocean “could” sneak back. You should not have to pay for that levee over one bucket of water, but we do.

So instead of deciding on which Band-Aid you want at your next vaccine appointment, take that time to decide whether you should get the vaccine in the first place. Your body and pocketbook will greatly appreciate you.

Plus I hear Dollar General just got in a new shipment of superhero Band-Aids.

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